A quintessential family home with a timeless, contemporary design. This residential project in Brighton is defined by high-quality materials and minimalist interior design.

Paying respects to the neighbourhood’s rich history and character, this oppressive, 1940’s home was completely stripped, and the back section demolished, leaving Penny Kinsella Architects and Mirabuild to transform a blank canvas into a quality dream home. 

A key feature carried over from the existing home, is the front facade by reason of council constraints on character requirements. This however, crafted a beautiful composition of old vs. new, highlighting the transformation of a post-war, 1940’s home into a light-filled, contemporary dream home.

 

Eccentric tapware

 

The simplicity of materials and colours, such as the concrete render,  black powder coated steel and grey ironbark decking, provide a sense of calmness and tranquility for this newly renovated family home. With the integration of natural and artificial light, the connection between inside and out is seamless, with a focus on water and landscape.

 

Rogerseller 

 

The focus on water continues into the bathroom with Eccentric tapware selected for its timeless and minimalist forms, brushed nickel finish and feel in the hand. Floor to ceiling windows are a feature in every space of the residence. The natural light highlights the compelling contrast of materials from the concrete style porcelain tiles to the timber benchtops. Falper’s Ciotola Round Benchmount Bowl was chosen for its sculptural form, matt finish and fine edges, making it the perfect statement piece to tie the materials together.

 

Falper’s freestanding bath.

 

Feel the warmth under your feet from the opulent underfloor heating as you step out of Falper’s freestanding bath. Every detail is thoughtfully considered for an added sense of luxury and trusted quality, remaining true to the client’s brief.

 

Shop the look

Shop the look:

Eccentric and Falper

Team:
Build by Mirabuild.
Architecture by Penny Kinsella Architects.
Photography by Cheyne Toomey.